A Companion to Modern British and Irish Drama 1880-2005 by Mary Luckhurst

By Mary Luckhurst

This wide-ranging Companion to trendy British and Irish Drama deals not easy analyses of quite a number performs of their political contexts. It explores the cultural, social, monetary and institutional agendas that readers have to have interaction with as a way to savor smooth theatre in all its complexity.

  • An authoritative advisor to fashionable British and Irish drama.
  • Engages with theoretical discourses not easy a canon that has privileged London in addition to white English men and realism.
  • Topics lined contain: nationwide, local and fringe theatres; post-colonial phases and multiculturalism; feminist and queer theatres; intercourse and consumerism; expertise and globalisation; representations of warfare, terrorism, and trauma.

Content:
Chapter 1 family and Imperial Politics in Britain and eire: The Testimony of Irish Theatre (pages 7–21): Victor Merriman
Chapter 2 Reinventing England (pages 22–34): Declan Kiberd
Chapter three Ibsen within the English Theatre within the Fin De Siecle (pages 35–47): Katherine Newey
Chapter four New girl Drama (pages 48–60): Sally Ledger
Chapter five Shaw one of the Artists (pages 63–74): Jan McDonald
Chapter 6 Granville Barker and the court docket Dramatists (pages 75–86): Cary M. Mazer
Chapter 7 Gregory, Yeats and Ireland'S Abbey Theatre (pages 87–98): Mary Trotter
Chapter eight Suffrage Theatre: group Activism and Political dedication (pages 99–109): Susan Carlson
Chapter nine Unlocking Synge this day (pages 110–124): Christopher Murray
Chapter 10 Sean O'Casey's strong Fireworks (pages 125–137): Jean Chothia
Chapter eleven Auden and Eliot: Theatres of the Thirties (pages 138–150): Robin Grove
Chapter 12 Empire and sophistication within the Theatre of John Arden and Margaretta D'Arcy (pages 153–163): Mary Brewer
Chapter thirteen while was once the Golden Age? Narratives of Loss and Decline: John Osborne, Arnold Wesker and Rodney Ackland (pages 164–174): Stephen Lacey
Chapter 14 A advertisement good fortune: girls Playwrights within the Fifties (pages 175–187): Susan Bennett
Chapter 15 domestic techniques from in another country: Mustapha Matura (pages 188–197): D. Keith Peacock
Chapter sixteen The is still of the British Empire: the performs of Winsome Pinnock (pages 198–209): Gabriele Griffin
Chapter 17 Wilde's Comedies (pages 213–224): Richard Allen Cave
Chapter 18 constantly performing: Noel Coward and the acting Self (pages 225–236): Frances Gray
Chapter 19 Beckett'S Divine Comedy (pages 237–246): Katharine Worth
Chapter 20 shape and Ethics within the Comedies of Brendan Behan (pages 247–257): John Brannigan
Chapter 21 Joe Orton: Anger, Artifice and Absurdity (pages 258–268): David Higgins
Chapter 22 Alan Ayckbourn: Experiments in Comedy (pages 269–278): Alexander Leggatt
Chapter 23 'They either upload as much as Me': the common sense of Tom Stoppard'S Dialogic Comedy (pages 279–288): Paul Delaney
Chapter 24 Stewart Parker's Comedy of Terrors (pages 289–298): Anthony Roche
Chapter 25 Awounded degree: Drama and global battle I (pages 301–315): Mary Luckhurst
Chapter 26 Staging ‘The Holocaust’ in England (pages 316–328): John Lennard
Chapter 27 Troubling views: Northern eire, the ‘Troubles’ and Drama (pages 329–340): Helen Lojek
Chapter 28 On battle: Charles Wood's army judgment of right and wrong (pages 341–357): sunrise Fowler and John Lennard
Chapter 29 Torture within the performs of Harold Pinter (pages 358–370): Mary Luckhurst
Chapter 30 Sarah Kane: from Terror to Trauma (pages 371–382): Steve Waters
Chapter 31 Theatre because 1968 (pages 385–397): David Pattie
Chapter 32 Lesbian and homosexual Theatre: All Queer at the West finish entrance (pages 398–408): John Deeney
Chapter 33 Edward Bond: Maker of Myths (pages 409–418): Michael Patterson
Chapter 34 John Mcgrath and well known Political Theatre (pages 419–428): Maria DiCenzo
Chapter 35 David Hare and Political Playwriting: among the 3rd means and the everlasting method (pages 429–440): John Deeney
Chapter 36 Left in entrance: David Edgar's Political Theatre (pages 441–453): John Bull
Chapter 37 Liz Lochhead: author and Re?Writer: tales, historical and sleek (pages 454–465): Jan McDonald
Chapter 38 ‘Spirits that experience turn into suggest and Broken’: Tom Murphy and the ‘Famine’ of contemporary eire (pages 466–475): Shaun Richards
Chapter 39 Caryl Churchill: Feeling international (pages 476–487): Elin Diamond
Chapter forty Howard Barker and the Theatre of disaster (pages 488–498): Chris Megson
Chapter forty-one studying heritage within the performs of Brian Friel (pages 499–508): Lionel Pilkington
Chapter forty two Marina Carr: Violence and Destruction: Language, area and panorama (pages 509–518): Cathy Leeney
Chapter forty three Scrubbing up great? Tony Harrison's Stagings of the previous (pages 519–529): Richard Rowland
Chapter forty four The query of Multiculturalism: the performs of Roy Williams (pages 530–540): D. Keith Peacock
Chapter forty five Ed Thomas: Jazz images within the Gaps of Language (pages 541–550): David Ian Rabey
Chapter forty six Theatre and expertise (pages 551–562): Andy Lavender

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As yet, however, these intellectuals have not managed to explain what psychological developments challenge the people-nation which allegedly enjoys such a controlling power within the larger arrangement. If the strain of running an empire has driven many decent people mad over the centuries, the stress of maintaining a United Kingdom or a European Union may also be damaging to the national verve. In The Satanic Verses Salman Rushdie mischievously marvels at the willingness of so many young people in 1980s London to abandon the idea of England – and one of his characters explains this with the remark that the British don’t really know who they are because so much of their history has happened overseas (Rushdie 1988: 343).

Wilde and Shaw concurred that England was simply the last and most completely penetrated of all the British colonies. Their espousal of androgynous heroes and heroines may be seen as a critique of the prevailing macho-imperial styles. ‘I would give Manchester back to the shepherds and Leeds to the stock-farmers’, proclaimed the youthful Wilde (see Kingsmill-Moore 1930: 45), already as worried as any BBC 2 presenter about the disappearing of the English countryside. ‘Home Rule for England’ became Shaw’s favourite slogan; and whenever he was asked by bemused Londoners for the meaning of the terrible words Sinn Fe´in, he told them ‘It is the Irish for John Bull’ (Shaw 1962: 149).

Although beatnik males could make the breakthrough of admitting a feminine element in their personalities, whether in Jimmy Porter’s long hair or in Elvis Presley’s intermittent falsetto, no sooner had they done this than they were unnerved by the very freedoms they had taken; and so the woman within each of them cried out for proof that they were still, despite everything, macho and masculine. One way of asserting a jeopardized virility was to engage in acts of occasional cruelty, something found not only in Porter’s behaviour but also in that of the many gangs which flourished in Anglo-American culture through the period.

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A Companion to Modern British and Irish Drama 1880-2005 by Mary Luckhurst
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